usa science and engineering festival dates
usa-science-and-engineering-festival-founding-host-lockheed-martin

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedId

Google Plus

YouTube

Facebook

Follow Me on Pinterest
Pins for usasef

2014 Expo Exhibits

Open Printer Friendly Version
 
  •   NSF: Where Discoveries Begin!
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Visit the National Science Foundation's exhibit area to explore tsunami waves, mind control, robots, spiders, cranberry acids, crazy physics experiments and more! Stage performances, a wearable tech fashion show and interactive activities will entertain and engage visitors of all ages.
  •   Wild Lives in Your Own Back Yard
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    You don't have to go to faraway rainforests or coral reefs to find an abundant variety of wild life. With your help, we're exploring the extraordinary life in ordinary, everyday places. Meet and greet some of these common creatures from mammals to insects, and learn how you (and your classroom) can help make important and real scientific discoveries in your back yard.
  •   Materials: The Essential Building Blocks of Everything
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    When designing materials, sometimes it's best to start at the end. We use agricultural leftovers, like coconut husks, to make Earth-friendly materials that can be used in cars and other products. Put on your safety glasses and lab coats, so we can study the fundamental properties of materials and choose the best material for the job. Learn to "think in systems" to develop materials that make products more cost-effective and environmentally responsible.
  •   Powering Today and Tomorrow
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    The sun delivers 20,000 times more energy to the earth each year than we consume. Unfortunately, we are only harvesting a small fraction of that energy potential. Come explore solar panels - an important technology to collect, store and use the sun's energy for our electricity needs. Design your own energy circuits and race solar-powered cars using different types of solar panels.
  •   No Meatheads Here. Brains are Brawn in this Game
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Brains beat brawn in WrestleBrainia 3000, an engaging two-player game that uses the electrical signals from players' muscles to power an arm-wrestling match between them. Players get visual feedback about their muscle firing patterns and learn basic concepts about the nervous system. Drop by and give your brain a workout.
  •   Music is the Sound of Physics
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    The ancient wind instrument, the pan flute shows how physics and math underlie nearly all of music making. Come design and create your own pan flute using scientific principles and measurements. Explore sounds using tubes of various lengths and see how design affects the sound-wave frequency and air vibration. You and your team can arrange a collection of different-length tubes into a giant xylophone and make beautiful music together!
  •   Keep Your Eye on Engineering to Solve Real-World Problems
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Put your engineering skills to the test with three design challenges! Design a device to catch blood clots in a model human circulatory system. Create and test barrier systems to prevent pollution of streams and waterways. Design the fastest and scariest roller coaster ride, "The Dare Devil." Get engaged in engineering to help people and the environment -- and have fun!
  •   Wear Your Heart on Your, er, Wrist
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Wearable health-monitoring systems offer tremendous potential to improve lives by giving patients and their doctors more complete information about their conditions. Instead of using bulky, heat-producing batteries for power, what if the devices could run on energy created by a hand shake? Learn about prototype wearable computers that monitor and visualize movement and daily activities, and a vital signs-measuring watch even James Bond would envy.
  •   Creepy Crawly: Spend a Day in a Spider's (Many) Shoes
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Whether you love 'em or hate 'em, spiders are everywhere. In fact, spiders are one of the most diverse groups of organisms in the world. We showcase the diverse behavior, ecology and sensory systems of these ubiquitous animals. Observe their spectacular diversity, participate in a spidery quiz show, test spider aggressiveness and try your hand at life in a web.
  •   How the Cranberry Was Crowned Jewel of the Bog
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    A bog is a foreboding place for many species- cold, acidic, with little oxygen in the soil. However, the cranberry thrives there. How can we preserve and improve this jewel of the bog for future generations? We are using genomic science to answer these questions and more. Without even donning your waders, you can learn about growing, harvesting, processing and storing the popular fruit, and how its acidic properties give it a rainbow of functions.
  •   Vera Wang, Can You Hear Me?
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Not exactly a dress with ears, "Flutter" integrates fashion and function to help a hearing impaired wearer navigate their surroundings. Come see Flutter and other exciting smart apparel and materials that think, respond and interact with the environment: talk to the glove, experience shape changing textiles and more!
  •   Fashioning the Future
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    We design garments and accessories not just for looks but for important functions -- like protecting firefighters and helping patients recover from injury! Our "fashion runway" might be a burning building or a hospital wing. Come see how e-textiles are sewn, learn how science and engineering principles are used to create winter clothing and how the geometry of 2D pieces of fabric become 3D garments. Discover how scientists are creating wearable gadgets that not only look good - but may help keep you safe too!
  •   Dive in to Engineering
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Small submersible vessels that dive to the ocean floor have revolutionized ocean exploration and research. To collect information, researchers need to make their submersibles dive deep and return to the surface. How do they do it? To find out, roll up your sleeves and immerse yourself in an ocean engineering challenge. Use what you know about why things float or sink to design, test and improve your own working submersible!
  •   Snakebots to the Rescue!
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    We seek inspiration from biology-snakes, elephant trunks, and insect swarms-to develop robots that boldly go where no one has gone before. See snakebots move in all sorts of ways and learn about their roles in search and rescue, surgery, and industrial inspection. You might even get to take one of these mesmerizing machines for a spin- not to worry, they don't bite!
  •   Little Shop of Physics
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Is a cloud warm or cold? How can you see your veins through your skin? In the Little Shop of Physics, you'll find the answers by exploring, experimenting and touching. Join our tie dye team, and try your hand at dozens of different experiments designed to learn how the world works.
  •   Rivers and Deltas in the Lab: Energy, Environment, Restoration
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    How much energy is in a river? What happens if we remove a dam? Learn how experiments and computer models can help harness energy and restore free-flowing rivers. How do river deltas support and protect coastal life? What are the challenges and benefits of restoring lost wetlands in the Mississippi Delta? What is the best site for Delta restoration? Get your hands dirty and find out for yourself!
  •   Linguistics: The Science of Language
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Talk and tap your finger to learn which half of your brain manages language. Make a spectrogram of your name to discover how linguists study sounds in Earth's 7,000 languages. Some results even inform crime solving and medicine! Come explore this distinctly human skill in your skull.
  •   Engineer Your Own Racebot
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Flow charts, algorithms and...teamwork? Yep, engineers use them all, and you can too, in this race-to-the-finish competition. Player teams program a robot to make its way through an obstacle course and across the finish line using the fewest commands and the shortest amount of time. No programming experience required!
  •   These Shoes Don't Just Look Smart - They Really Are!
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    Gait analysis can be a great way to detect early stages of neurological disorders. Come experience our "smart shoe". It's imbedded with sensors to assess walking patterns and give feedback to assist in correcting them. Lace up this high-tech footwear to see if you're walking on the wild side. Learn how many intricate systems are engineered to make the whole thing work.
  •   Survive the Wave
    by National Science Foundation NSF and Friends Pavilion, Hall A, Booth Number 423
    The 2004 tsunami in the Indian Ocean was one for the record books, but did you know that the most destructive tsunamis have occurred along the coasts of California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and Hawaii? Earthquakes at the ocean floor most often generate tsunamis, and the first wave can reach the beach in just a few minutes. Use your engineering skills to design and build a structure to withstand a tsunami in our 16-foot wave tank.

View My Exhibits

Share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Like: